pull-aside

n.
An informal meeting between leaders, officials, or diplomats at a public event. Also: pull aside.
Example Citation:
"The speeches from the podium are only one aspect of the diplomatic convocation, which will comprise thousands of bilateral meetings, regional conferences and focused but informal 'pull-asides' for leaders to exchange views on specific subjects."
— Betsy Pisik, "Campaign against terrorism to dominate U.N. summit," The Washington Times, November 9, 2001
Earliest Citation:
Q In addition to the bilateral meeting with Chinese President Jiang in Seattle, is the president going to have bilateral meetings with each and every leader of the members or just some of them?...
SR. ADMIN. OFFICIAL: Yeah. I do not think he's going to have bilateral meetings with all of the leaders. ... They are going to take off on Saturday morning and leave most of the rest of us behind and have some time for private, informal consultations. During that time, I am certain he will have the opportunity for what we call 'pull asides' with all of the leaders, a chance to talk with them one on one.
—"USIA Foreign Press Center; Background Briefing; Topic: Foreign Policy Issues of Interest to the White House," Federal News Service, October 8, 1993
Notes:
The verb-to-noun background of this phrase was pithily put forward by William Safire a few years ago:
"A similar construction goes from the verb 'to pull aside,' to the diplomatic noun, a pull-aside, which means 'a private meeting at a public event.'
— William Safire, "On Language," The New York Times, August 28, 1994
Related Words: Category:

New words. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • pull aside — [phrasal verb] pull (someone) aside : to take (someone) to one side away from other people for a private conversation The reporter pulled me aside and asked if I knew who was in charge. • • • Main Entry: ↑pull …   Useful english dictionary

  • pull aside — index divert Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • Pull — Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster] Ne er pull your hat upon your brows. Shak.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pull — vb Pull, draw, drag, haul, hale, tug, tow mean to cause to move in the direction determined by the person or thing that exerts force. Pull, the general term, is often accompanied by an adverb or adverbial phrase to indicate the direction {two… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • aside — [ə sīd′] adv. [ME < on side: see A 1 & SIDE] 1. on or to one side [pull the curtains aside] 2. away; in reserve [put the book aside for me] 3. out of the way; out of one s mind [lay the proposal aside temporarily ] …   English World dictionary

  • pull back — Synonyms and related words: about the bush, abrupt, alienate, avoid, back down, back out, backslide, balance, beat a retreat, beat around, beg the question, blench, blink, boggle, cast off, cast out, cock, cringe, cut adrift, cut off, cut out,… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • pull out — Synonyms and related words: abandon, abrupt, alienate, apostatize, avulse, back down, back out, bank, be getting along, beat a retreat, beg off, betray, bolt, break away, buzz off, cast off, cast out, come away, crab, cringe, cry off, cut adrift …   Moby Thesaurus

  • To pull a finch — Pull Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster] Ne er pull your hat upon your brows.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pull and haul — Pull Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster] Ne er pull your hat upon your brows.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pull down — Pull Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster] Ne er pull your hat upon your brows.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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